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20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
. they threw out the european union plan that included a levy on bank accounts. government leaders need to raise $5.8 billion euros to qualify for a bailout worth $10 billion. they accepted an eu plan that involved taking money from people's bank accounts. lawmakers flew that plan out. the government leaders want to raise the collateral by reorganizing major banks and creating a fund without using people's savings. they want to have the lie and's biggest bank absorb the rest. members of the staff union are protesting in front of the parliament building. they say breaking up the bank would destroy 2,000 jobs. even if lawmakers approve the new plan, eu officials may reject it. leaders in germany had doubts about the way leaders intend to raise the money. analysts say the negotiations will be tough. cyprus' finance minister tried to get help from russia but he's on his way home empty handed. he spent two days talking with his russian counterpart bloomberg quotes him as saying he hadn't been able to get the support he wanted and he said he still has a chance to get the russians to ease the
. >> officials plan to compile new strategies within a year to minimize possible damages. >>> japanese government officials say north korea has violated united nations trade sanctions. they filed a report with the united nations accusing the country of exporting nuclear related materials. japanese customs officials found aluminum alloy rods last august on a cargo ship docked in tokyo. the vessel had come from north korea via the chinese city of dalian. the japanese government introduced legislation three years ago allowing customs agents to inspect suspicious cargo from north korea. experts concluded that the aluminum rods could be used as parts for centrifuges in a nuclear facility. this violates a u.n. security council resolution that bans north korea from trading in nuclear-related materials. japanese officials have ordered the storage company to hand over the cargo. >>> it took two months of negotiations but he's been sworn in. they will lead a block that support jewish settlements. no party was able to capture in january. netanyahu entered into negotiations to form his coalition. lawmakers a
in syria. ghassan hitto lived in the u.s. for decades but now he will govern parts of syria controlled by rebel forces. members of the syrian national coalition met in istanbul, turkey. they voted to elect hitto who moved to turkey last year to help coordinate the opposition. the coalition plans to launch an interim government for northern syria which is under rebel control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of fighting between rebels and president bashar al assad's forces. analysts say some in the coalition see hitto as an outsider. they also doubt rebel groups which are not part of the coalition will accept an interim government. >>> people across iraq are looking back at a war that caused many problems. u.s. forces invaded their country. saddam hussein collapsed, but it continued on much longer. nhk world's sho beppu covered the war and its aftermath. he's now back in baghdad. sho, how are things in the iraqi capital now? >> reporter: right. i can say that it changed quite a lot compared to those worse days. it seems lively, at least on the surface, streets in baghdad are busy,
government officials have instructed the operator of the fukushima plant to install more backup power. employees struggled for more than a day. >> reporter: we told them to supply multiple power sources and implement other efforts as quickly as possible to restore public confidence in the safety of the plan. the handling has greatly damaged public trust. >> tepco officials failed to report the problem promptly. they ordered them to improve their risk management. it took crews more than day to restore power to all the cooling systems. >>> march 20th anniversary. iraqi leaders remain confidence that renewed oil production will help pave the way for prosperity. they are already investing more in the region to meet growing energy demand around the world. >> reporter: the ground beneath the deserts of southern iraq hold some of the world's largest untapped oil deposits. decades of war and sanctions left the country's oil industry in a state of disrepair. but multinational corporations have returned to start new oil production. this is the oil field in southern iraq. i'm standing here on a
by the japanese government owns the remaining 40%. about 2,400 people work here around the clock. engineers from pakistan and bangladesh work with colleagues from malaysia, japan and iraq. >> japanese count. all right. eight count, please. all right. >> reporter: every morning, workers exercise before heading to the construction site. it's an idea implemented by the japanese employees to foster a sense of community among workers with different languages and cultures. kazuhiro ouwai from japan oversees the on-site work flow. he instructs the workers on safety procedures. they speak to each other in english, but all have different accents. communication often takes time. >> what? >> projection. >> protection? >> projection. >> translator: one of my priorities is to make sure no one is hurt here. safety is very important for us. >> reporter: officials from the joint venture have also started on-site vocational training. instructors teach six subjects, including english and i.t. skills. so far, 340 people have participated. some have started working at the site. >> translator: i want to study englis
networks to their normal status and find out what caused the outages. government officials in seoul have dealt with several cyber attacks in the past. they overloaded websites with mass iive amounts of data in ju 2009. they confirmed for the first time a cyber attack by north korea. in march 2011 hackers blocked access to the website of the office of the south korean president and other government agencies. they traced the take to a north korean government agency in china. two months later another agency halted atm services at a south korean bank. professor kim jong un says the latest cyber attack is different from those in the past. >> translator: many private firms use shared servers. workers for these companies use the same programs in the same computer systems to nd out emails and access data. if hackers infect such a shared server with a computer virus, all the firms using the same server will be affected. i think this is what happened today. i think it was an organized crime. because the perpetrators were familiar with our schedule. they aimed for 2:00, when banks carry out most of
signs of vitality. here in japan the japanese government beginning steps to implement major changes after decades of inflation. concerns are coming from europe and affecting global markets. let's see how we're opening up here. the markets this time yesterday got a big boost. we did see the euro surge. the relief seems to be short lived as we're seeing in the opening lels. the rescue deal for cyprus could serve as a template for other european countries with strug e struggling banks. that comment really heightens some of the worries in global markets that the deal that was made may result in more problems down the road. now a bit of a negative reaction here in tokyo. we also might see which is a bit of a worry is a return to safer assets by investors including the yen. >> many investors watching the yen's movement. the japanese currency has been on a major weakening trend. where do we stand this tuesday morning? >> that's a big focus. you mentioned the moves by prime minister abe. let's look at some of the currency levels here and the pairs today. we've seen some volatility with the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)